Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation: Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation: Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation: Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation



What would it take to grow mushrooms in space? How can mushroom cultivation help us manage, or at least make use of, invasive species such as kudzu and water hyacinth and thereby reduce dependence on herbicides? Is it possible to develop a low-cost and easy-to-implement mushroom-growing kit that would provide high-quality edible protein and bioremediation in the wake of a natural disaster? How can we advance our understanding of morel cultivation so that growers stand a better chance of success? 

For more than twenty years, mycology expert Tradd Cotter has been pondering these questions and conducting trials in search of the answers. In Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, Cotter not only offers readers an in-depth exploration of best organic mushroom cultivation practices; he shares the results of his groundbreaking research and offers myriad ways to apply your cultivation skills and further incorporate mushrooms into your life?whether your goal is to help your community clean up industrial pollution or simply to settle down at the end of the day with a cold Reishi-infused homebrew ale. 

The book first guides readers through an in-depth exploration of indoor and outdoor cultivation. Covered skills range from integrating wood-chip beds spawned with king stropharia into your garden and building a “trenched raft” of hardwood logs plugged with shiitake spawn to producing oysters indoors on spent coffee grounds in a 4×4 space or on pasteurized sawdust in vertical plastic columns. For those who aspire to the self-sufficiency gained by generating and expanding spawn rather than purchasing it, Cotter offers in-depth coverage of lab techniques, including low-cost alternatives that make use of existing infrastructure and materials. 

Cotter also reports his groundbreaking research cultivating morels both indoors and out, “training” mycelium to respond to specific contaminants, and perpetuating spawn on cardboard without the use of electricity. Readers will discover information on making tinctures, powders, and mushroom-infused honey; making an antibacterial mushroom cutting board; and growing mushrooms on your old denim jeans.

Geared toward readers who want to grow mushrooms without the use of pesticides, Cotter takes “organic” one step further by introducing an entirely new way of thinking?one that looks at the potential to grow mushrooms on just about anything, just about anywhere, and by anyone.



List Price: $ 39.95

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Comments

  1. 50 of 50 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    this masterpiece goes into so much detail and has such great photos and instructions, October 28, 2014
    By 
    DC

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation: Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation (Paperback)
    If you have ANY questions on how to grow mushrooms, this is THE book to get! While many books I’ve been reading have lightly touched on the subject, this masterpiece goes into so much detail and has such great photos and instructions, after reading it cover to cover, I immediately started earmarking trees for mushrooms growing and planning which varieties I’m going to order! Coming from a laboratory background (molecular biology/protein biochemistry), I am very impressed with his level of scientific detail and his skill at showing how even an amateur without lab experience can setup his/her own lab and do so sterile and cheaply! The best part about this book was his details on keeping your cultures going by using rolled up cardboard and plastic bags, it’s brilliant! As much as I enjoyed Stamets’ books, I found this one to be easier to read and more user-friendly.
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  2. 4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Very pretty pictures, thin content., September 28, 2016
    By 
    Brian

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation: Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation (Paperback)
    Skip. Get a Stamets book instead.

    This book focuses mostly on pictures and personal anecdotes, with very little substance. With prolific use of such specific terms as “medium yield” and “a lot” and “some”, you’ll be well on your way to not having any clue about cultivating mushrooms in no time!

    Sarcasm aside, I bought this and “Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms” by Paul Stamets at the same time, since the Stamets book is fairly old, although highly regarded. I can definitely tell why, now. After reading through both, I sold this book and kept the Stamets book, since it, ultimately, makes a better mushroom-growing reference book.

    The pictures in this book are very, very pretty, though.

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  3. Homesteader says:
    20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Home-scale to commerical-scale mushroom growing, February 15, 2015
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    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation: Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation (Paperback)
    I’ve been lucky enough to hear Tradd speak in person a few times, and his lectures are always visually appealing, intellectually revealing, and completely inspiring. His book is more of the same — which is to say awesome!

    I’ve been particularly wanting more information on rafts, totems, and propagating mushrooms on cardboard, and this book form of the lectures I’d attended didn’t disappoint. In addition to providing step-by-step directions (with great diagrams and photos) on those topics, the text provided additional home-scale experiments that I’m itching to try, including propagating shiitakes using stacked rounds, raising oyster mushrooms on old clothes and coffee grounds, and producing homegrown morel spawn/microbe slurry for outside inoculation. (If you have no idea what I’m talking about, don’t worry — the beginning of the book has great information to bring beginners up to speed.)

    The last third of the book consists of species-by-species cultivation accounts, and I’ll save that for more intensive reading later. For now, this book is one of the few titles — about three to five per year — that contains such a breadth and depth of information that it merits a permanent place on my bookshelf.

    For those of you new to mushrooms, this is probably the book I’d recommend reading first. It’s like a combination of the inspiring accounts of Mycelium Running with the hands-on information of Stamets’ older text, but with a more homestead-scale appeal. But I should warn you that you’ll need to commit serious time to reading Tradd’s chapters slowly and in order since my initial skim was a bit disappointing — raising more questions than it answered. Only after I read every word did the true wonder of the book gel together into a beautiful whole. So even if you’re an intermediate mushroom growing, start with chapter one and prepare to be inspired!

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