Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions

Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions

Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions



Capture the flavors of Italy with more than 150 recipes for conserves, pickles, sauces, liqueurs, infusions, and other preserves

The notion of preserving shouldn’t be limited to American jams and jellies, and in this book, author Domenica Marchetti turns our gaze to the ever-alluring flavors and ingredients of Italy. There, abundant produce and other Mediterranean ingredients lend themselves particularly well to canning, bottling, and other preserving methods. Think of marinated artichokes in olive oil, classic giardiniera, or, of course, the late-summer tradition of putting up tomato sauce. But in this book we get so much more, from Marchetti’s in-person travels across the regions of Italy as well as the recipes handed down through her family: sweet and sour peppers, Marsala-spiked apricot jam, lemon-infused olive oil, and her grandmother’s amarene, sour cherries preserved in alcohol. Beyond canning and pickling, the book also includes recipes for making cheese, curing meats, infusing liqueurs, and even a few confections, plus recipes for finished dishes so you can savor each treasured jar all year long. 
 



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  1. savvyshoppr says:
    32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    I love, love, love this book!, June 30, 2016
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    This review is from: Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions (Paperback)
    One of my favorite cookbooks of all time. After a couple of years growing vegetables and water bath canning and pickling, I heard the author interviewed on The Splendid Table and could not wait to get this book. As an Italian American I was so excited to learn about preserving vegetables in olive oil. The book is laid out sensibly with beautiful pictures and excellent explanations, and I will use these recipes again and again. I was hoping it would have a recipe for oven dried tomatoes under oil and it does, but it has so much more–not only does it teach you to preserve food, it has recipes for how to use the preserved food in other recipes, and even has a recipe for almond gelato. I am so grateful that these old Italian methods are being preserved (no pun intended) for future generations.
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  2. Adri Barr Crocetti says:
    20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Preserving the Seasons – Italian Style, August 2, 2016
    By 
    Adri Barr Crocetti (California) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    This review is from: Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions (Paperback)

    Seasons come and seasons go, but with Domenica Marchetti’s new book “Preserving Italy” you can save the flavors of the season, Italian style. From start to finish, Ms. Marchetti guides the reader from market to kitchen, from chopping board to canning jar. Technique, inspiration, and recipes come together to give the reader everything needed to create an Italian preserver’s pantry.

    With a copy of this book in hand there is no need to fear canning. Enzymes, molds, yeasts, and bacteria, all are explained clearly, and fears and concerns are allayed. Tips for safe preserving are included along with a thorough discussion of both water-bath canning and pressure canning.

    The reader need have no fear of being faced with recipes that call for twenty pounds of produce; this is small batch canning at its most delicious. You’ll find recipes, real savory Italian classics, in the chapter Foods Preserved in Oil. Whether you favor baby artichokes, asparagus, garlic scapes (the newest darling of the food world), eggplant, grilled mushrooms, grilled zucchini, or eggplant, there is enough here to transform your American pantry into a real version of Italian abbondanza.

    One of the nicest things about this book is that it is more than just a collection of recipes. Ms. Marchetti offers suggestions for how to incorporate her recipes into other dishes. Oil-Preserved Butternut Squash makes an appearance in Farro Salad. Lemon Olive Oil adds flavor to Spaghetti al Limone and Baked Whole Trout with Citrus Salt. Fiery Hot Olio Santo adds its inimitable kick to Vegetable Zuppa, and Savory Mint Sauce brings a bright mouthful of flavor to Grilled Summer Vegetables.

    Did you grow up snacking on Giardiniera, that toothsome mélange of vegetables and spices? Ms. Marchetti includes her version in the chapter Foods Preserved in Vinegar. You’ll find Cippollini in Agrodolce – tiny Italian onions preserved in balsamic and white wine vinegar, sugar, and spices. Add them to Insalata di Riso or include them on an antipasto platter, and you are sure to please family and friends. Think of Wine-Spiked Julienne Carrots as carrot pickles, and enjoy them straight from the jar or in a salad or vegetable platter. You’ll also find recipes for pickling cauliflower, beets and spring onions, zucchini, mushrooms, and peppers along with suggestions for how to use them in recipes.

    There’s plenty here for those with a sweet tooth. Sweet Preserves offers a generous collection of preserves, jams, jellies, conserves, spoon fruits, and marmalades. Rich red Plum Preserves offer up vibrant flavor and are surprisingly easy to make. They are delectable atop toast with Buttermilk Ricotta. Fig Jam with Orange Zest has rich figgy flavor and a delightful seed-flecked appearance. With a grace note of citrus this jam, as Ms. Marchetti suggests, makes a terrific filling for a crostata and a sumptuous accompaniment for roasted or grilled pork. If it’s a familiar jam you are after try the Blackberry-Apple Jam. This classic owes its perfect texture to the addition of a green apple added for a bit of pectin. The flavor is pure blackberry, and it is delicious on toast, even better as a filling for bomboloni, the Italian version of jelly doughnuts. Peach and Almond Conserva is an absolute delight. With almonds for added texture and Marsala for the real flavor of Italy, this is bound to be a family favorite.

    Tomatoes and Sauce gives these wonderful summer fruits the royal treatment. Bottled Whole Tomatoes, ripe plum tomatoes preserved in passata (tomato puree) are a must for any Italian pantry. A shelf full of these will keep you in sauce all through the year. Recipes for Passata di Pomodoro, Tomato Conserva (tomato paste), Small-Batch Tomato Sauce, Classic Meat Sauce, Oven-Dried Tomatoes, and Oven Roasted Tomatoes in Oil will turn you into a tomato expert in no time.

    The chapter Infused Oils, Vinegars, and Condiments is a real treasure trove. Easy recipes like Citrus Salt and Porchetta Salt bring flavor to everything from meat to vegetables. You’ll find recipes for Seasoned Vinegars and flavored olive oils. Fans of hot peppers can indulge their love for the fiery with Peperoncino Cream or Abruzzo’s famous Olio Santo. You can even pick up a needle and thread and string a Peperoncino Garland. There are recipes for Spiced Tomato Jam, Quince Paste, Classic Pesto, Caponata, and Pesto Abruzzese. Plus you’ll learn to be cure your own olives.

    If you have ever wanted to make your own cheese or cure your own meat, the chapter Fresh Cheeses and Simple Cured Meats provides an informative introduction. Ricotta made with buttermilk is the perfect place to start. Or try Liguria’s famous Prescinseua for a trip down the road slightly less traveled. If sausages and salumi are your pleasure, the…

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  3. Austen Fan says:
    19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Love all the different chapters including home made pancetta!!, June 28, 2016
    By 
    Austen Fan (New England) –

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    This review is from: Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions (Paperback)
    There are so many wonderful things to try! I am hard pressed to pick just one. Love the stories woven thru of traditions that are behind the recipes it adds so much to the fabric of life in the regions. There are also recipes for what you can use these special jars of goodness for. There is a recipe for a premade ‘holy trinity” to keep refrigerated and streamlines weeknight meals in the process! It is cherry season so perhaps I will start with the Boozy cherries! I immediately went back online to order additional copies for gifts to my Italian teacher who moved here from Abruzzo 25 years ago, for my dearest friend who is Italian decent and has introduced me to homemade canning recipes from the north of Maine, and for my college friend who married into a 1st generation Italian family and has embraced all the wonderful recipes from her ‘Nonna’ –
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